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The Brown Political Review is a non-partisan political publication that seeks to promote ideological diversity. All of the views reflected in BPR’s content are views held by authors and not reflective of the views held by the wider organization or the Executive Board.

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Political insults in South Korea make American politics look tame. Liberals call conservatives “authoritarian pro-Japanese traitors,” while conservatives call the current liberal government a “pro-North Korean leftist dictatorship.” But polit...

Mixed Member Pandemonium

Political insults in South Korea make American politics look tame. Liberals call conservatives “authoritarian pro-Japanese traitors,” while conservatives call the current liberal government a “pro-North Korean leftist dictatorship.” But polit...

Thirteen percent of students admitted to Brown’s Class of 2023 are international, together representing 80 countries. These students are not alone; there are over a million international students studying in the United States today. But after gradu...

Let Them (H-1)B

Thirteen percent of students admitted to Brown’s Class of 2023 are international, together representing 80 countries. These students are not alone; there are over a million international students studying in the United States today. But after gradu...

Meet Fabien Lehagre. He moved from California to France at the age of two when his French father and American mother divorced. Now, in his thirties, Lehagre works as a salesman for an oil company in Littany, France. Recently, his bank requested his s...

No Taxation Without Expatriation

Meet Fabien Lehagre. He moved from California to France at the age of two when his French father and American mother divorced. Now, in his thirties, Lehagre works as a salesman for an oil company in Littany, France. Recently, his bank requested his s...

After the Japanese annexation of the Korean peninsula in 1910, many Koreans migrated to Japan—some voluntarily, others by force. During Japan’s 35-year occupation of the country, all Koreans were legal Japanese citizens, but after the defeat of t...

Between Borders

After the Japanese annexation of the Korean peninsula in 1910, many Koreans migrated to Japan—some voluntarily, others by force. During Japan’s 35-year occupation of the country, all Koreans were legal Japanese citizens, but after the defeat of t...